Farmers Markets contribute to state economy,Maria Nowacoski of Windstone Landing Farms puts fresh asparagus, jams and other products she brought to the Wellsboro Growers Market on display. The market is open on Thursdays during the summer and the Potter County Famers Market is open Fridays in Coudersport. See story below.

Another area ID theft probed….DUI charges pending against Ridgway man involved in altercation….Study shows economic importance of farm markets…Republican state senator will introduce bill allowing parents to be notified of sexually explicit curriculum https://soundcloud.com/gerri-miller-611294886/black-forest-broadcasting-podcast-april-7-2022

Yet another ID theft is under investigation in the Black Forest Broadcasting Service Area. State police at Emporium report someone used the personal information of a 55 year old Emporium woman to fraudulently apply for unemployment compensation last summer.

DUI charges are pending against 40 year old Joseph Elias of Ridgway. Troopers there claim Elias was involved in a minor altercation early Sunday morning on Maple View Drive in Ridgway Township and was found to have driven his 2020 Ford F250 Supercab to that location while under the influence.

Pennsylvania farmers markets generate an estimated $100 million in sales each year, according to a new Penn State Extension analysis that provides a snapshot of farmers markets’ contribution to the local food economy in the commonwealth.

Using 2021 data collected from 15% of the farmers markets in Pennsylvania, the researchers found that these markets generated gross sales of about $18 million. The researchers then extrapolated these sales figures to take into account the more than 330 open-air community farmers markets in the state. Their analysis indicated that these markets generated, conservatively, $100 million of direct economic activity over the six-month market season.

This research was initiated at the end of 2020, when Penn State Extension received $10,000 from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s PA Preferred program to support a data collection project during the 2021 market season. The project was aimed at creating a culture of data collection within markets and communicating the value of these businesses across the commonwealth.

At the beginning of the project, market managers filled out a form with the market name, day of the week the market is open, county location, zip code, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program information, and any additional matching dollars program.

 

 

 

Each week, market managers entered their customer counts, the number of SNAP transactions, SNAP dollars distributed and redeemed, and SNAP bonus or matching dollars distributed and redeemed. Market managers also asked their anchor produce and meat vendors for their number of daily transactions and whether gross sales were higher, lower or the same as the previous week.

Penn State Extension researchers will continue data collection in the 2022 market season.

For more information about the data collection project or the postseason survey, contact Brian Moyer at bfm3@psu.edu or 484-269-0229.

(State Sen. Ryan Aument (R-36) announced that he will sponsor a bill that would require schools to identify sexually explicit content in school curriculum and materials and notify parents that their child’s coursework includes such content.

According to Aument, his office has been contacted in recent months by parents concerned with the content of their children’s school curriculum and frustrated by the unfortunate interactions with administrators who subsequently dismissed their concerns. His office has also been provided with some disturbing examples of these materials from local schools in Lancaster County as well as from schools across the state, including content that adults would be prohibited from viewing while at work.

Under the bill, parents would have the opportunity to review the materials and the power to opt their children out of that coursework or prevent their child from viewing that particular book from the library.  If the parent decides to opt their child out of coursework, the child will be provided with a non-explicit alternative.

The power of parents to opt their children out of coursework containing this explicit content is consistent with PA Code § 4.4, which allows children to be excused from specific instruction.

The PA Department of Health reports, there have been 44,370  Covid 19 deaths in the state to date. Deaths  in the Black Forest Broadcasting Service area  to date are mostly  holding steady.

Cameron 20

Elk 100

McKean 138

Potter 91

Tioga 192

All 154

Cat 221

 

April 9 & 10

Take a walk with Alyson Rotello to learn about river otters and their habitats from 11a-12p at Sinnemahoning State Park.Alyson will start the program with a brief talk about otters and their ecological relationship with the lake and streams in the park.  Then she will lead the group on a slow walk along the lake shore to look for otter signs. The walk will be up to 1 mile over uneven ground. Participants should wear boots or sturdy shoes and be sure to dress for the weather. All ages are welcome to attend.

Alyson Rotello, a 2017 graduate of Austin Area High School, received a bachelor’s degree in Marine Biology from St. Francis University.  Alyson is currently working on her master’s degree in Environmental Education at Slippery Rock University and enjoys volunteering at Sinnemahoning State Park between work and classes.

 

 

 

Sinnemahoning staff will also be offering two egg programs on Sunday, April 10th in the classroom of the Wildlife Center.

Natural Egg Dyeing, from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM, will offer visitors the opportunity to dye an egg to take home using only common kitchen food items. Kids and adults alike will enjoy discovering the range of colors you can create. Best for ages 5 to adult.  Children will require adult supervision.

Kids’ Storytime and Egg Scavenger Hunt, from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM, will begin with a reading of the book, An Egg is Quiet, by Dianna Hutts Aston, then follow with an egg-themed indoor scavenger hunt.  Children ages 3-7 will have fun while learning about animals that lay eggs.

For more information about programs and events at Sinnemahoning State Park, please visit the DCNR Calendar of Events at https://events.dcnr.pa.gov/sinnemahoning_state_park/calendar.

If you need an accommodation to participate in PA State Park activities due to a disability, please contact the park you plan to visit.  With at least seven days’ notice, interpreters for people who are deaf or hard of hearing are available for educational programs.